Weekly Anime Round-Up: December 23rd – December 29th

This season is over, and with New Year’s in Japan popping up, this is also a slow week.  The last handful of show’s in the round up take their final bow and those that don’t won’t be back until the next season starts up.  This is a good time to catch up on those backlogs I suppose.

Coppelion:  Episode 13
Why does anyone care about the Ozu sisters?  They are horrible, horrible people.

Coppelion is finally over, and while this story arc comes to a close, this show is intended to draw people to the manga, so that means if you want more of this, you better get reading.  I really enjoyed this show, and I think its overall popularity unfairly suffered because it aired during a season of overhyped shows.  That being said, if there was one thing that bothered me about this show was its terrible tendency for every single evil character to turn “good” after a couple acts of kindness, no matter how vile they were.  This makes for poorly written characters on both sides of the spectrum, with the only “bad” entity of the show being future-Japan politics.  Despite a few flaws, however, Coppelion presents an interesting universe that in itself is more than enough reason to give this show a watch.

Kakumeiki Valvrave:  Episode 24
(Valvrave the Liberator)
 Shoko continues to prove herself as the most selfish slut in all of anime, right to the bitter end.

The insanity of Valvrave is finally over!  Now, to be perfectly fair, in terms of judging a final episode, this was actually pretty decent in many ways.  We are treated to some very cool, very well animated fight scenes, and everything is drawn to a complete conclusion.  Sunrise exceeded my expectations on this one, but be warned, the final scene is as irritatingly dumb as the rest of this show.  Valvrave has been scooping up nominations for “worst anime of the year” along several blogs, yet still seems to maintain a loyal fanbase.  That being said, this show is frighteningly entertaining, even when you know it is terrible.

Little Busters!  Refrain:  Episode 13
Are you tough enough to be a REAL Little Buster?

Key manages to play with our hearts just enough to make for yet another great anime under their brand of emotional roller coasters.  Everything in this heart-wrenching tale comes together in a wonderful finale that touches on our emotions, and it’s great that there is anime that can do this.  If you enjoyed Clannad and Angel Beats, you should certainly give this show a shot, it is an amazing anime that is more than worth your time.

Machine-Doll wa Kizutsukanai:  Episode 12
(Unbreakable Machine-Doll)
Even Mega-Butler is no match for Level 2 Super-Yayain

The guilty-pleasure of the season has finally ended, for better or worse.  While I didn’t expect a conclusive ending for a show intended to promote its light novel series, I still consider this to be a rather weak ending for the show.  There is no real conclusion to the story arc or any decent presentation of a major element of the overall storyline, this just sort of “ends.”  Yaya is still the only reason you should be watching this, and even then I would say to just wait until the BD version pops up in a few months.  Oh yeah, I guess the ending song was pretty great, too.

    Monogatari Series: Second Season:  Episode 26
Even gods try to hide their powerlevel.

Nadeko isn’t happy that Kaiki has been messing with her, so now Kaiki must defeat her in a battle of wits in order to save himself.  This story arc ended well, but with a shocking twist right at the end.  SHAFT has the bold ambition to animate every bit of this, so this won’t be the last we see of the Monogatari franchise for a long time.  I found myself disappointed with this entry in the series, and I personally think it tends to get a bit more praise than it really deserves, but there are many out there that would say that sort of talk is pure blasphemy.

Varms.net’s expert on anime and just about anything else you should not discuss with friends, family, and co-workers. I also play some video games so I can complain about them with Gillman.